Indigenous in Brazil

With more than 305 recognised Indigenous communities and over 170 different Indigenous languages in Brazil, the following video is a compilation of interviews from Indigenous students from the University of Brasilia. These students share their insights on being Indigenous, at times speaking to their experiences as students at the university.

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In this short clip Te Aonui Muriwai and Maumahara Paringatai-Walker share insights on the importance of their culture and our connection to the taiao (environment). Maumahara shares how the moana (ocean) provides for us and that we need to take care of it.

https://vimeo.com/809925347With more than 305 recognised Indigenous communities and over 170 different Indigenous languages in Brazil, the following video is a compilation of interviews from Indigenous students from the University of Brasilia. These students share their insights on being Indigenous, at times speaking to…

“Te Hononga-ā-Kiwa aims to increase Māori business engagement, capability, and awareness internationally.“

Arden Morunga, a year 10 student, shares his whakaaro (thoughts) on the current landscape of our taiao (environment) and what we need to start doing in order to "leave a positive legacy for the future, our tamariki".

E topa, e tiu nei taku manu kopara ki Parinuitera, ki te whenua e kiia nei ko te ahunga mai o te hua kai o tatau ngai taketake, ka tau ha. - to sit under title.

The Tobilung community is a group of people living in the state of Sabah, Malaysia. They are known for their unique culture and way of life and are believed to be the descendants of Borneo islanders who have lived in the region for many centuries.

https://vimeo.com/757107208 “whakapapa ki a au he hono i a tātou ki hapū kē atu ki whānau kē atu ki iwi kē atu”. Whakapapa connects us to other families and communities. In the following video Tiorere, Ruawhaitiri and Tiaana share their…

https://vimeo.com/757110879 In the following video Hori and Breana share their thoughts on how we as Māori can engage in challenges happening both globally and locally. They also touch on the importance of how we as Māori, as Indigenous.

The following kōrero (story) was written by a year 10 Mount College student, Piri Pearsall-Akuira who shares her insights on what being a global citizen means to her after attending one of our Te Rangitāmiro summits in Tauranga Moana.

Seek your whakapapa. Embrace your identity. Be courageous.

Te Aonui Wharawhara-Muriwai